Posts tagged ‘Conservation’

With us all spending so much more time at home in recent weeks we’ve all had to get used to using our spaces differently – whether it’s setting up extra office space or a place for home-schooling. Many people are turning their minds to re-thinking how their house might work better for them in the longer-term – by making a more permanent workspace, or just craving a bit more personal space to do whatever it is that keeps them going. This might be an extension for a home gym or cinema, a flexible studio space or an office to work from home. At Mosedale Gillatt Architects we have been carrying out virtual consultations with a number of clients, helping them to develop their ideas online. It’s quick, easy and effective – and often starts with the client sharing a video ‘walk through’ of the property. The first consultation is free, and with agreement we then go on to finalise the brief and prepare sketches – we share these drawings on screen and talk them through.

Our first meeting is about listening and understanding – you will have already been thinking about what you need to do – now you just need to test your ideas out! We can help you plan and deliver your needs remotely, and help you bring in other expertise as you need it.

Many people with listed buildings think that a contemporary extension isn’t possible – but because Mosedale Gillatt are recognised for our expertise as both Architects and Conservation Architects we have successfully won planning approval for listed and existing houses, as these images show.

For a free initial consultation contact us now on 0191 281 4802 or studio@mgarchitects.info.

Sometimes a photo does not do a building justice, and in the case of the restoration of a fully working water-powered corn mill that is definitely true!

The wheels are now turning at Warwick Bridge Corn Mill following extensive repair and conservation, and these videos are but a glimpse of how the building and machinery have been brought back to life.

Mosedale Gillatt Architects are proud to have been part of this amazing journey.

 

It’s been a busy 6 months on site since we first let you know that works had commenced at Seaton Delaval Hall in December last year. The work being carried out as part of the National Lottery Heritage Funded project covers much of the site and although we’ve been sharing regular updates, we thought it timely to provide a round up of what’s been happening;

You can’t miss the fact that extensive works to the West Wing have begun. The sheeted scaffold protecting this precious roof structure is now a prominent feature on the skyline for miles around. The existing bitumen felt roof has been stripped to expose the historic timbers, and we are in the process of surveying the condition of the oak trusses and masonry. This has been a complex process, with evidence of historic fire damage and later repairs across the building. We are working closely with the National Trust and Archaeologists to ensure that we retain as much of the historic fabric as possible.

Construction of the all important cafe at the Brewhouse is at the halfway point, and the form of the new roof structure and walls can be clearly seen.  This is a key element of the project, and National Trust have already begun recipe testing to establish the new menu for opening.

Works to the Bastions and Haha structures have progressed significantly. Much of the work will be concealed when the repairs are finished, but the structural interventions will ensure that these significant elements of the planned landscape will remain standing for many years to come. The North East and South East Bastions have been carefully reinforced below ground level with ring beam structures, and sections of unstable masonry have been rebuilt. These just await final landscaping before being complete, and you can view works to the North West Bastion as part of your visit currently.

The works to the Walled Gardens are most visible through the careful dismantling and re-build of the West Wall, and the installation of new buttresses along the North Wall. However further work is planned across the full elevations to consolidate the walls fully.

Exciting new path networks can now be seen emerging across the site and Studio Hardie’s structures for play and interpretation are being installed. The wider landscape proposals (based on the 1781 estate plan) play an important role in bringing together all the buildings and other features on the site, and visitors can now start to appreciate this.

All in all, it’s been a busy time at Seaton Delaval. However, this is only the first 6 months of an 18 month project. We’ll keep you updated on progress, here’s to the next 6 months!

 

If you want to take a closer look, the site remains open for visitors Friday – Sunday and you can find out more about what the National Trust are up to on their website

Work has just started on one of the largest National Trust construction projects ever seen in the North of England. As Conservation Architect and Lead Consultant we are pleased to be involved with this nationally important project. Seaton Delaval Hall closed to the public at the beginning of November to allow work to begin across a range of buildings and structures on the site. Exciting proposals for new cafe, landscape and play schemes are to be implemented as part of the wider scheme. The site will re-open in February 2019, however the repair and renewal process will continue until Summer 2020 meaning that you can see the conservation works up close as they progress.

You can keep up to date with progress on their website here.

You may be aware from the regular stream of site photographs over the past couple of months we’ve been sharing that work has commenced on the restoration of this Grade II* listed watermill at Warwick Bridge. We’ve been involved in this project for over 4 years and are delighted to see works progressing on site. The project looks to restore the building to it’s original form with the mill machinery operating. Working closely with the client – North of England Civic Trust, and a wide range of mill specialists, we’re unravelling the history of the site as we complete essential repair work.

The completed building will also host an artisan bakery and create its own power with the introduction of a hydro-electric generator. Forecast for completion in Spring 2019, we’ll keep you regularly updated on progress.

It was all go at our project Holy Trinity in Sunderland last weekend as they celebrated the Tall Ships being in port nearby and hosting the Georgian Festival in its grounds.

The weekend also saw the opening of  a unique art installation within the building.  Gogmagog: Voices of the Bells is a new sound installation created by artist Matt Stokes. The installation, sited in the nave of the Church, reinterprets a peal rung on its bells in 1898.

Whilst the bells are currently silenced due to the condition of the bell tower, a new version of the peal has been given life by local bell ringers, musicians, singers and choirs, drawing lyrics from the story of the church’s historical social roles.

Gogmagog is part of an Arts and Humanities Research Council funded research project, Mapping Contemporary Art in the Heritage Experience, which explores how contemporary art might change visitors’ experience of a heritage site.

Led by a group of researchers from Newcastle and Leeds Universities, the project is interested in finding out whether creating and siting new art in heritage places can change the ways in which these important places are understood and enjoyed.

This is a fantastic start to what is looking to be an incredible journey in the repair, conservation and adaptation of this building, giving it a new lease of life with our client The Churches Conservation Trust