Posts tagged ‘Conservation’

Work has just started on one of the largest National Trust construction projects ever seen in the North of England. As Conservation Architect and Lead Consultant we are pleased to be involved with this nationally important project. Seaton Delaval Hall closed to the public at the beginning of November to allow work to begin across a range of buildings and structures on the site. Exciting proposals for new cafe, landscape and play schemes are to be implemented as part of the wider scheme. The site will re-open in February 2019, however the repair and renewal process will continue until Summer 2020 meaning that you can see the conservation works up close as they progress.

You can keep up to date with progress on their website here.

You may be aware from the regular stream of site photographs over the past couple of months we’ve been sharing that work has commenced on the restoration of this Grade II* listed watermill at Warwick Bridge. We’ve been involved in this project for over 4 years and are delighted to see works progressing on site. The project looks to restore the building to it’s original form with the mill machinery operating. Working closely with the client – North of England Civic Trust, and a wide range of mill specialists, we’re unravelling the history of the site as we complete essential repair work.

The completed building will also host an artisan bakery and create its own power with the introduction of a hydro-electric generator. Forecast for completion in Spring 2019, we’ll keep you regularly updated on progress.

It was all go at our project Holy Trinity in Sunderland last weekend as they celebrated the Tall Ships being in port nearby and hosting the Georgian Festival in its grounds.

The weekend also saw the opening of  a unique art installation within the building.  Gogmagog: Voices of the Bells is a new sound installation created by artist Matt Stokes. The installation, sited in the nave of the Church, reinterprets a peal rung on its bells in 1898.

Whilst the bells are currently silenced due to the condition of the bell tower, a new version of the peal has been given life by local bell ringers, musicians, singers and choirs, drawing lyrics from the story of the church’s historical social roles.

Gogmagog is part of an Arts and Humanities Research Council funded research project, Mapping Contemporary Art in the Heritage Experience, which explores how contemporary art might change visitors’ experience of a heritage site.

Led by a group of researchers from Newcastle and Leeds Universities, the project is interested in finding out whether creating and siting new art in heritage places can change the ways in which these important places are understood and enjoyed.

This is a fantastic start to what is looking to be an incredible journey in the repair, conservation and adaptation of this building, giving it a new lease of life with our client The Churches Conservation Trust